The last man

A plaque to George Price in the Anglican Church yard in Port Williams.

A plaque to George Price in the Anglican Church yard in Port Williams.

The small crocheted flower, dark with the blood of George Price, was preserved and framed by a young Belgian woman that he gave it to as he lay dying. 70 years later her daughter returned it to his nephew.

The small crocheted flower, dark with the blood of George Price, was preserved and framed by a young Belgian woman that he gave it to as he lay dying. 70 years later her daughter returned it to his nephew.

The last Imperial soldier killed in World War One was George Price from Port Williams, Nova Scotia. Under the terms of the Armistice hostilities would cease at the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month. According to Margrete Kristianson, a curator at the Prescott House Museum in Starr’s Point, near Port Williams, Price was shot by a sniper at 10:54 and died at 10:58 am, two minutes before war’s end.

In the last four minutes of his life Price gave the crocheted flower his girlfriend in Saskatchewan had given him to a young Belgian woman who had run to his aid. At a 1991 dedication of a bridge in Belgium near the spot where Price was shot that girl’s daughter gave the framed, blood soaked flower to Price’s nephew, George Barkhouse of Kingsport. Barkhouse, who was born after the war, says his mother and grandmother had been in Port Williams with other family members and community residents celebrating war’s end, then came home to the crushing news of Price’s death.

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